Yellow Flowers

Dahlias and roses in the garden.

 

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Make a Festive Summer Bouquet

The best part about growing flowers in the garden is cutting blossoms for bouquets in the house. Whether you grow roses, sunflowers, lavender or mums, there are always ways to bring the beauty of your garden inside.

Since my dahlias have been growing like gangbusters, I’ve been clipping stems whenever I get a chance. I also have roses that were here when we moved in (that I nearly cut down), mums that are blooming even though it’s not fall and Minoan Lace that reseeded from last year and has taken over a corner of my front garden.

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Here’s a bouquet I made recently with dahlias, roses, Minoan lace and lavender. I reused a glass apple juice container I had saved.

 

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Here are some roses I clipped from a wild shrub outside of my office window.

 

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This one includes a lily, dahlias, poppies, Minoan lace, broccoli flowers and sprigs from my lemon tree in a teapot with bicycles on it.

 

To make flowers last, I use this recipe, that I got from the book Petal & Twig, and adjust it to adapt to the size of the container:

1 chopped up non-coated aspirin

1 tablespoon sugar

1 teaspoon vinegar

3 cups water

Ode to Dahlias

Dahlias are a must-have in a summer garden. Not only are they super easy to grow, they also make great cutting flowers. Clip four or five flowers and you have yourself an easy, single-flower bouquet.

5 Simple Tips for Growing Dahlias

  1. Plant tubers in the spring. That way you’ll get beautiful blooms in the summer.
  2. Give them sun. Dahlias are sun lovers so give them plenty of sunshine, 6+ hours a day.
  3. Stake ‘em. If you plant a taller variety of dahlia, be sure to give it some support by staking it.
  4. Keep them watered. While you sure don’t want to flood your dahlias (most plants don’t like having wet feet), keeping the soil moist will ensure your plants have food to grow.
  5. Dig up the tubers in the fall if you live in a cold area. Dahlias are hardy in warm areas, but won’t survive in the ground in an area that gets below 20 degrees Fahrenheit. I leave mine in the ground, but I also live in zone 9. We got a hard frost a few years ago and it was like the world was ending.

 

My mom bought me this dahlia last year when she came out to help with the baby. Now when it blooms, I think of her.